What is a Yurt?

According to Wikipedia:

A yurt is a portable, bent dwelling structure traditionally used by nomads in the steppes of Central Asia as their home. The structure comprises a crown or compression wheel, usually steam bent, supported by roof ribs which are bent down at the end where they meet the lattice wall. The top of the wall is prevented from spreading by means of a tension band which opposes the force of the roof ribs. The structure is usually covered by layers of fabric and sheep’s wool felt for insulation and weatherproofing.

According to us:

A yurt is a stepping stone on the path we are on. We are in the process of building a yurt prototype, in an effort to build a much larger yurt to actually live in. We can have a home that is paid for, owned and able to move to another location when we are ready.

We currently live in a very hip camper. We moved here from a small rental in an effort to begin the “living-small” journey and to live at our means with the ability to save for what is ahead. This fall we want to travel abroad – because we can. We can button up our home and travel and see other homes and other communities. Then return home; as a home, to the project.  IMG_3583 IMG_3687 IMG_3686IMG_3684 IMG_3685 IMG_3635 IMG_3280 IMG_3225IMG_3223 

This season of life is about redefining home “ownership”. . .or home relationship.

Do we build a home? Are we homeless without the place to dwell? Or is the home created when we are together? { And later, let’s talk about God building His home in us. . .}

Turn back a page with me. . . Bankruptcy redefined ownership. A few years ago we “lost” the home we “owned” due to a bankruptcy connected to our small business. The “American Dream” cast before my generation (and others) is one where your time is spent working and creating a home and a career in the “freedom” this country provides. I like that idea. But I didn’t own the land my home was on. And I wasn’t even going to own the home outright for another 30 years. . . AND I was in the process of paying double payments as a good – low – debt – minded consumer should be doing. Yet, the home was no longer mine to own in about 11 months. Seven years and countless hours and tens of thousands of dollars. . . I was free to be a slave to the debt of the home. It is slavery wrapped in the banner of freedom. Home ownership.

I could have fought for it. I could have continued to be indebted to it’s payment. . . never-the-less. . . we let it go.

(Next, renting didn’t seem so bad after losing the house. A landlord would fix what was broken, a yard company would maintain the lawn and we didn’t get “distracted” with what home project was next on the docket. If you are reading this, renting may be the sweet spot for you.)

Fast forward to now. A yurt.

(Lessons in Physical science meets artistry meets risk meets desire meets hardship meets home. ) 

IMG_3544 IMG_3519 IMG_3547IMG_3537 IMG_3543  IMG_3538 IMG_3539 IMG_3541 IMG_3534 IMG_3533 IMG_3526 IMG_3525 IMG_3553 IMG_3554 IMG_3556 IMG_3559 IMG_3560 IMG_3681 IMG_3695 IMG_3694 IMG_3693 IMG_3692 IMG_3691 IMG_3780 IMG_3779 IMG_3784 IMG_3774 IMG_3773 IMG_3772 IMG_3769 IMG_3768 IMG_3762 IMG_3892 IMG_3900 IMG_3898

Why? Because a yurt s a home that you can own. It could have easily been a repurposed shipping container or tent. . .

You see this is an experiment in “God is Provider,” “Husband is Leader,” “embracing hardship as many cultures do,” “living-small,” “slow-food,” “minimalism,” “un-schooling,””un- American” “why not?” Adventure.

This season doesn’t hinge on building a yurt, instead building one hinges on the season. We have more important things to build than a place to dwell; we need to build a new home. The home will be found in the building and exploring the possibilities beyond the square walls of the American Dream.

We can always go back to “living easy.”

IMG_3896 IMG_3895 IMG_3407 IMG_3409

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “What is a Yurt?

  1. I can’t wait to see the Yurt when it is done. I can’t say I have ever wanted to live in one, but I have always wanted to travel around north america in a camper, bringing my home with me as I go.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s